The document by which it was created dates back to the night between 27 & 28 May 1955, when Turin Council, presided over by the mayor, Amedeo Peyron, and supported by Maria Tettamanzi, councillor responsible for education, sat long into the night to discuss the aims of the new cultural authority and to decide upon an annual contribution of 20 million lire and the concession of the antiquated auditorium of Teatro Gobetti. The newly created Piccolo Teatro della Città di Torino, after the crisis of twenty years of fascism and wartime destruction, was given the role of reviving the theatrical tradition of the city which had seen the creation of the Compagnia Reale Sarda in the first half of the nineteenth century and later, in the early years of the twentieth century, the thriving activity of the Teatro di Torino, founded by Riccardo Gualino, which was suppressed by Mussolini’s regime.

The first two seasons were directed by Nico Pepe, a respected actor who had become known as an interpreter of Goldoni and a leading figure in the university theatre. The inaugural production, which opened on the 3 November 1955 in the restored Teatro Gobetti, was Goldoni’s “Gli innamorati”, along with a one-act play by Alfred De Musset entitled “Non si può pensare a tutti”. The director was a very young Anna Maria Rimoaldi, who was to make a name for herself as the leading spirit behind the Premio Strega. In its first year, the theatre staged ten productions, with 171 performances in Turin, ten in other regional theatres and 18 outside the Piedmont region. During the 1957/58 season, Pepe was succeeded by the young Venetian director Gianfranco De Bosio who directed the theatre for the next decade and rapidly succeeded in establishing the reputation of the Turin repertory company at national level. With the centenary celebrations of the Unification of Italy in 1961, he triumphed on the stage of Teatro Carignano with a presentation of “La resistibile ascesa di Arturo Ui” (The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui) by Bertolt Brecht, one of the rare performances of Brecht that escaped the monopoly of the Piccolo Teatro di Milano. From then onwards, the historic auditorium of Teatro Carignano, owned by the municipal council and privately managed for many years, was to regularly host major TST productions.

It was only in 1977 that this eighteenth century theatre, prototype of the Italian style theatre, officially became the headquarters of the Teatro Stabile. The direction of De Bosio is inextricably linked with the rediscovery of Ruzante and productions of “La Moscheta” in 1960, “Anconitana e Bilora” (1965), and “I Dialoghi” (1966) that were also performed on tour abroad in Latin America (1960), in France and Belgium (1965) and in Russia (1966). De Bosio dedicated great attention to contemporary theatre without ignoring the classical theatre of Goldoni, Shakespeare, Chekhov and Pirandello. From France, he imported the Theatre of the Absurd of Eugéne Ionesco (“Sicario senza paga” (Killer Without Pay) and “Il re muore” (Exit the King)) and Samuel Beckett (“Giorni Felici”(Happy Days), “Atto senza parole” (Act without words) and “L’ultimo nastro di Krapp” (Krapp’s Last Tape)), as well as staging plays by such Italian writers as Natalia Ginzburg (“Ti ho sposato per allegria” (I Married You for the Fun of it)), Alberto Moravia (“Il mondo è quello che è” (The World is What It Is)) and in particular Primo Levi, with “Se questo è un uomo” (If This Is a Man) in 1966, the adaptation of the disturbing autobiographical account of his imprisonment at Auschwitz. De Bosio worked with some of the best known actors of the Italian stage, such as Paola Borboni, Gianni Santuccio, Lilla Brignone, Luigi Vannucchi, Ernesto Calindri, the young Dario Fo and Franca Rame, Giulio Bosetti, Franco Parenti, Salvo Randone, Adriana Asti, Laura Adani, Valeria Moriconi, Glauco Mauri and Vittorio Gassman who, in 1968, played the title role in the memorable production of Shakespeare’s “Richard III”, directed by the young Luca Ronconi, with set design by the sculptor Mario Ceroli and costumes by Enrico Job, one of the most memorable productions in the history of the TST.

With the crisis of 1968 a direction team was set up consisting of Giuseppe Bartolucci, champion of the avant-garde, Daniele Chiarella, manager of Teatro Carignano, Federico Doglio, theatre historian, Nuccio Messina, organisational director of the theatre (from 1964), and Gian Renzo Morteo, Ionesco authority and translator. During that period of transition, the theatre produced ground-breaking plays that aroused controversy and curiosity among audiences, such as “I testimoni” (The Witnesses) by the Polish playwright Tadeusz Rozewicz, in which Jannis Kounellis, future master of “arte povera”, made his debut as set designer; “Orgia” (Orgy), drama/manifesto of the “teatro di parola” of Pier Paolo Pasolini, with Laura Betti and Gigi Mezzanotte; “Il sogno” (A Dream Play) by August Strindberg performed in Italian by Ingrid Thulin, the great Swedish actress who rose to fame in the films of Ingmar Bergman and who died recently. During these years, the Teatro Stabile di Torino was the first in Italy to created a new relationship with schools and the city suburbs through animation and travelling theatre. In 1970, the famous Turin comedian Erminio Macario, a well-known variety performer, crowned his career as a theatre actor in his performance with the TST of the Piedmontese classic “Le miserie ‘d monssù Travet” by Vittorio Bersezio.

The experience of “team direction” ended in 1971, after three years, with the appointment of Franco Enriquez as director, but he resigned his post at the end of the season. He was succeeded by the Genoa director Aldo Trionfo, who made his name with the memorable staging of “Puntila e il suo servo Matti” (Herr Puntila and His Man Matti) by Bertolt Brecht, with Tino Buazzelli and Corrado Pani. During his four years in Turin, Aldo Trionfo directed the productions of his artistic maturity, with the assistance of the great stage designer Emanuele Luzzati and such leading actors as Franca Nuti (in Ibsen’ s “Peer Gynt”), Marisa Fabbri (Euripides’ “Electra”), the immortal Paola Borboni (Shakespeare’s “King John”), the variety star Wanda Osiris (“Nerone è morto?” by Hubay), the great avant-garde actor Carmelo Bene and the young Franco Branciaroli who became a leading actor with Trionfo at Turin. Trionfo was succeeded by the director Mario Missiroli who, assisted by Giorgio Guazzotti as organisation co-director, led the theatre for the next eight years, until 1984. Having won public and critical acclaim in 1977 with “Zio Vanja” (Uncle Vanya) by Anton Chekhov, interpreted by Gastone Moschin, Annamaria Guarnieri, Monica Guerritore and Giulio Brogi, Missiroli staged a series of successful productions with impressive stage designs by Enrico Job – “Verso Damasco” (Towards Damascus) by August Strindberg, “I giganti della montagna” (The Mountain Giants) by Luigi Pirandello, “Musik” by Frank Wedekind, “La villeggiatura” by Carlo Goldoni and the “remake” of Pasolini’s “Orgia”, once again with Laura Betti. Missiroli’s favourite actors, in addition to Gastone Moschin and Annamaria Guarnieri, were Glauco Mauri and Paolo Bonacelli, the last of whom took the leading role in Machiavelli’s “Mandragola” (with an elegant stage design by Giulio Paolini) and Moliere’s “Malato immaginario” (Le Malade Imaginaire).

Between 1985 and 1989 the theatre was directed by Ugo Gregoretti who, among other things, could claim credit for bringing back to the stage a great actor such as Walter Chiari with “Il critico” (The Critic) by Richard Sheridan and offering Luca Ronconi the arduous task of staging “Mirra” by Vittorio Alfieri, an elegant and vibrant production performed by the young new discovery Galatea Ranzi, along with Ottavia Piccolo and Remo Girone. Gregoretti was succeeded by Luca Ronconi himself who, in 1989, produced “Besucher” by Botho Strauss in Turin with Umberto Orsini and Franco Branciaroli, in 1990 “Strano Interludio” (Strange Interlude) by Eugene O’Neill, with Massimo De Francovich and Galatea Ranzi, “L’uomo difficile” (The Difficult Man) by Hugo von Hofmannsthal, with an all-star cast: Marisa Fabbri, Massimo Popolizio, Annamaria Guarnieri, Luciano Virgilio, Mauro Avogadro, as well as Umberto Orsini, Massimo De Francovich and Galatea Ranzi. On 29 November 1990, in the Pressing Room of the disused Fiat factory at Lingotto, now transformed by Renzo Piano into Turin’s Congress Centre, Luca Ronconi staged what was perhaps the most complex and titanic production in living memory, “Gli ultimi giorni dell’umanità” (The Last Days of Mankind) by Karl Kraus, a catalogue of the horrors and absurdities of the First World War. It was staged using real railway trains and wagons moved by hand along their tracks, a cannon factory, a field hospital, a newspaper press, six hundred costumes with around fifty actors and a hundred stage technicians. Ronconi, who founded the TST acting school in 1992, which still remains one of the most active and prestigious schools in Italy, left Turin in 1994. Over the last ten years, the theatre was run for three years from 1994-1997 by Guido Davico Bonino, a former theatre critic and university academic, for three years from 1997-2000 by the actor and director Gabriele Lavia, then by the director Massimo Castri, who was succeeded in Spring 2001 by the director Walter Le Moli. Limiting ourselves to mentioning only the major productions over the last period of years, it is important to remember several that were directed and interpreted by Gabriele Lavia, such as “Il giardino dei ciliegi” (The Cherry Orchard) and “Commedia senza titolo (Platonov)” (A Play Without a Title (Platonov)) by Anton Chekhov, “Scene da un matrimonio” (Scenes from a Wedding) by Ingmar Bergman, “Non si sa come” (No One Knows How) by Luigi Pirandello, “Il misantropo” (Le Misanthrope) by Molière and “Edipo re” (Oedipus Rex) by Sophocles, the latter being produced for the Greek amphitheatre at Siracusa. With regard to the renewed strategy of dialogue and exchange with European theatre, we must at least recall “La serra” (The Hothouse) by Harold Pinter, starring Carlo Cecchi under the direction of Pinter himself, the greatest living English playwright, and the breathtakingly elegant and demanding Franco-Italian co-production of “Pene di cuore di una gatta francese” (Peines de cœur d’une chatte française) during the 1999-2000 season by the highly versatile Parisian director Alfredo Arias. Massimo Castri, during his two years as Director at Turin, staged a number of vibrant and exciting productions that brought admiration at national level, such as “Ifigenia” (Iphigenia) by Euripides, “La ragione degli altri” by Luigi Pirandello, “Madame De Sade” by Yukio Mishima and “John Gabriel Borkmann” by Henrik Ibsen. Under the current direction of Walter Le Moli, the TST is working towards an intensification of its production activity, both by encouraging numerous projects involving youth companies and local groups, as well as undertaking major projects such as last year’s Shakespearean trilogy “Tre storie d’amore” which was co-ordinated by Mauro Avogadro, Director of the Theatre School, with three French directors, Jean-Christophe Sais, Mamadou Dioume and Dominique Pitoiset, and also, in the current season, the complex and arduous co-production of “Peccato che fosse puttana” (Tis a Pity She’s a Whore) by the Elizabethan dramatist John Ford, directed by Luca Ronconi. Under the direction of Walter Le Moli, particular attention has been placed upon the “story” that is being staged, making it possible for new themes and characters to be brought to the stage, as musical theatre has always done. This long experience began, during the season 2002/2003, with the return to the stage of “Don Chisciotte”, Cervantes’ monumental work, followed by Goethe’s “Wilhelm Meister” re-interpreted by Gabriele Vacis, with “Comédie Humaine”, directed by Dominique Pitoiset, and finally “La Peste” a decidedly twentieth century work staged by Claudio Longhi and his extraordinary company of actors. The list of productions for the Season 2004/2005 places great emphasis on the relationship between theatre and music. This is so, for example, with the productions of “Marat-Sade” by Peter Weiss, “dressed up” in the score of Vivaldi’s “The Four Seasons”, or with “L’Impresario delle Smirne” (The Impresario from Smirne) performed by opera singers under the direction of Davide Livermore. For the season 2005 – 2006 the Teatro Stabile di Torino makes a start on eighteen plays. The intense opening of the season is assigned to Martirio, by Georges Bernanos, with the direction of Gabriele Vacis; Il lavoro rende liberi, by Vitaliano Trevisan, a clear analysis of our everyday life, proposed in Toni Servillo’s production. At the centre of Disco Pigs by Enda Walsh, directed by Valter Malosti, and of Senza, written by Filippo Taricco and Beppe Rosso, are stories of marginalisation. Considerable space is devoted to the classics: a double version of Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet, directed by Gabriele Vacis; Euripides’ Alcestis, directed by Massimo Castri; Facciamo nostril questi giganti! by the Marcido Marcidorjs e Famosa Mimosa company; The lady from the sea by Henrik Ibsen, directed by Mauro Avogadro. The tempest, libretto by Luca Fontana from Shakespeare with the direction of Giancarlo Cobelli, and Le bel indifférent by Cocteau, adapted by Pierluigi Pizzi and Marco Tutino and directed by Davide Livermore, blend singing and prose in two performances characterised by a “musical theatricality”. At the very heart of the whole season lies the Domani project, by Luca Ronconi, five performances centred on dramas and contradictions of our times. Finally two plays come back: Il benessere by Franco Brusati, at its third year of scheduling with the direction of Mauro Avogadro, and A room of one’s own by Virginia Woolf, with Laura Curino. The new hall of the Teatro Vittoria has hosted Leopardi, directed by Claudio Longhi, and In forma di parole. Scrittori letti da scrittori, in which have taken part Edoardo Sanguineti, Vincenzo Cerami, Patrizia Valduga, Rossana Campo, Tiziano Scarpa, Aldo Nove.

During the 2006/2007 season Teatro Stabile di Torino produced: Le Lacrime Amare di Petra von Kant by Rainer Werner Fassbinder, directed by Antonio Latella; Macbeth by William Shakespeare directed by Valter Malosti, and Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, directed by Luca Ronconi, part of the celebrations for Turin as World Book Capital together with Rome. There was an important initiative staged with the Unione Musicale. Musica per il teatro, teatro per la musica (music for the theatre, theatre for music) was the title of the project which celebrated the dialogue between music and drama on three occasions: Didone with the Orchestra Europa Galante directed by Fabio Biondi, the show Eraritjaritjaka by Heiner Goebbels, and Oedipus in Kolonos with the Orchestra Sinfonica and Coro Sinfonico Giuseppe Verdi of Milan directed by György Györivànyi Raht.
During the season Teatro Stabile di Torino joined the Union of the Theatres of Europe, giving rise to an intense network of exchanges with the main theatres in Europe and beyond. Out of the 38 guest shows, high profile events included those by Teatre Lliure, Schauspielfrankurt, Habimah National Theatre of Israel and Teatro Nacional Saõ Paolo Porto.
In May 2007 Evelina Christillin was appointed President of Teatro Stabile di Torino.

The programme for 2007/2008 opened with the sixteenth UTEFest, the festival of the Union of the Theatres of Europe, featuring more than twenty shows and big names on the theatre circuit including Lev Dodin, Declan Donnellan, Gabor Zsambeki, Roger Planchon, Stephane Braunschweig, Urs Troller and Staffar Valdermar Holm. Teatro Stabile di Torino confirmed its position as one of the most interesting theatres both artistically and organisationally on the national and international panorama.
With regards to production, the theatre’s activity revolved around a nucleus of actors who alternated in Dossier Ifigenia (directed by Elie Malka), The Changeling and Antigone (directed by Walter Le Moli), La folle giornata (directed by Claudio Longhi), and A voi che mi ascoltate (directed by Victor Arditti).
Alongside these shows was Tre de Musset directed by Mauro Avogadro and a series of coproductions and collaborations: Venere e Adone directed by Valter Malosti, Canti dall’inferno directed by Davide Livermore, Turin Eleven – a project by Laura Curino and Roberto Tarasco, Keely and Du directed by Beppe Rosso, and SynagoSyty directed by Gabriele Vacis.
There were 36 guest productions.
In December 2007 Mario Martone became Director of the Fondazione Teatro Stabile di Torino.

In May 2007 Evelina Christillin was appointed President of Teatro Stabile di Torino.

The programme for 2007/2008 opened with the sixteenth UTEFest, the festival of the Union of the Theatres of Europe, featuring more than twenty shows and big names on the theatre circuit including Lev Dodin, Declan Donnellan, Gabor Zsambeki, Roger Planchon, Stephane Braunschweig, Urs Troller and Staffar Valdermar Holm. Teatro Stabile di Torino confirmed its position as one of the most interesting theatres both artistically and organisationally on the national and international panorama. With regards to production, the theatre’s activity revolved around a nucleus of actors who alternated in Dossier Ifigenia (directed by Elie Malka), The Changeling and Antigone (directed by Walter Le Moli), La folle giornata (directed by Claudio Longhi), and A voi che mi ascoltate (directed by Victor Arditti). Alongside these shows was Tre de Musset directed by Mauro Avogadro and a series of coproductions and collaborations: Venere e Adone directed by Valter Malosti, Canti dall’inferno directed by Davide Livermore, Turin Eleven – a project by Laura Curino and Roberto Tarasco, Keely and Du directed by Beppe Rosso, and SynagoSyty directed by Gabriele Vacis. There were 36 guest productions.

In December 2007 Mario Martone became Director of the Fondazione Teatro Stabile di Torino. The first season directed by Mario Martone (2008/2009) was characterised by the choice of a series of themes connected with each venue: actors at Teatro Carignano, playwrights at Teatro Gobetti, directors at Fonderie Limone Moncalieri, contemporary theatre at the Vittoria, and major productions at the Nuovo. Mario Martone set out to create a homogeneous cultural programme, a harmonious blend of productions and guest shows giving rise to a clear overall picture. Martone, working in parallel with the Acting School directed by Mauro Avogadro, inspired the creation of the School for the Spectator directed by Guido Davico Bonino, the Acting Course for singers directed by Davide Livermore and the Writing course for contemporary dance directed by Raffaella Giordano.

La menzogna, a show created and directed by Pippo Delbono, focussing on the tragedy of work-related deaths, opened the 2008/2009 season at Fonderie Limone Moncalieri. On 2 February 2009, after a year of restoration work, Teatro Carignano reopened. One of Turin’s Baroque treasures, the auditorium was restored to its original eighteenth century splendour, and also modernised to create a state of the art venue. Zio Vanja, directed by Gabriele Vacis and produced by Teatro Stabile, was the inaugural performance.

A retrospective at the Cavallerizza Reale paid tribute to Guido Ceronetti, with his I misteri di Londra and Albergo Ceronetti, conceived and directed by Virginio Liberti. Valter Malosti directed the touching Quattro atti profani by Antonio Tarantino, staged at Fonderie Limone Moncalieri. This season also saw a number of Teatro Stabile’s historic shows being restaged: Camillo and Adriano Olivetti by Laura Curino and Gabriele Vacis, and Guarda che luna!, a tribute to the talent of Fred Buscaglione, by Banda Osiris, Enrico Rava, Gianmaria Testa, Stefano Bollani, Enzo Pietropaoli and Piero Ponzo. Guests included Toni Servillo, Federico Tiezzi, Luca De Filippo, Franco Branciaroli, Carlo Cecchi, Enzo Moscato, Arturo Cirillo, Fura dels Baus, Moni Ovadia, Scimone and Sframeli. Teatro Nuovo played host to Kontakthof, one of the last shows by Pina Bausch’s company in Italy before the death of the great choreographer. Important partnerships were forged with Teatro Regio, Museo Nazionale del Cinema, Università degli Studi di Torino and Dams.

Theatre, dance, music, art and multimedia productions were the keys to our activities, which took the form of eleven new productions, four repeat productions, and seventy-two guest companies, eleven of whom from abroad. The 2009-2010 season began with the Prospettiva09 Autumn Festival, directed by Mario Martone and Fabrizio Arcuri, and supported by Torinodanza festival, Artissima 16, Club to Club and other national cultural institutions, which featured a total of fifty productions in two months. The guest artists included Rafael Spregelbrud from Argentina, Forced Entertainment, René Pollesch, Big Art Group, Abattoir Fermé, Motus, Socìetas Raffaello Sanzio, Emma Dante, Giorgio Barberio Corsetti, Compagnia della Fortezza, Ascanio Celestini, Teatro Valdoca, Filippo Timi, Accademia degli Artefatti and Babilonia Teatri, as well as a number of groups from Torinodanza festival, State of Indenpen/Dance created by Club to Club, and sixteen appointments/performances by Artissima 16. For the first time, Teatro Stabile was involved in the preparations for the Torinodanza Festival, directed by Gigi Cristoforetti, hosting performances at the Fonderie Limone and Cavallerizza Reale. On the stage were some of the most versatile contemporary dance talents: the Royal Ballet of Flanders, Virgilio Sieni, Lucinda Childs, Pierre Rigal, Caterina and Carlotta Sagna, Koen Augustijnen, Emio Greco and Pieter C. Scholten. The first production staged was Betrayal by Harold Pinter, directed by Andrea Renzi, while Fiabe Italiane (Italian Folktales) debuted at the Carignano on January 19, 2010,a project devised and directed by John Turturro and sponsored by the Ministry for Cultural Heritage, to mark the 300th anniversary of Teatro Carignano. Andrea De Rosa proposed the first complete performance of Manfred by Byron-Schumann, a joint production by Teatro Stabile and Teatro Regio, with the Orchestra and Choir conducted by Gianandrea Noseda. Laura Curino provided a powerful period piece in Il signore del cane nero, Valter Malosti produced a sarcastic Molière/ L’École des Femmes, Beppe Rosso concluded the tribute to Jane Martin with Flags, and Gipo Farassino returned to the stage with Stasseira, a sweet-sour reminiscence of Turin in the 1950s. In March 2010, the effect of the 150th anniversary of the Unification of Italy began to be felt at the Cavallerizza Reale with the review Teatro e Storia (Theatre and History), coordinated by Giovanni De Luna. In June 2010 Valter Malosti took over as Director of the Training course for actors at the Teatro Stabile di Torino school.

The 2010 – 2011 season of Teatro Stabile di Torino features more great events, with seventy-three works and two great festivals. Prospettiva2 returns from October 15 to November 14, 2010, with a programme that focuses on the question of the double in forty-seven moments. The Torinodanza festival (September 7 – November 13 2010) began with the prestigious appearance at MITO of the Royal Ballet of Flanders and Emio Greco Ι PC, under the evocative name of Miti. The second focus concentrated on a historical and artistic moment that was fundamental for dance: the Eighties. The third focus is dedicated to one of the most important contemporary choreographers, Alain Platel, Pina Bausch’s artistic heir. The season that marks the 150th anniversary of Italian Unification features some important productions, which accompany audiences on a journey of ideas through the history of Italian theatre scripts: Giacomo Leopardi’s Operette morali interpreted by Mario Martone; Vittorio Alfieri’s Filippo, directed by Valerio Binasco; I promessi sposi alla prova, a masterpiece by Giovanni Testori directed by Federico Tiezzi; Rusteghi by Goldoni, directed by Gabriele Vacis; and finally, Virginio Liberti with Questa sera si recita a soggetto by Luigi Pirandello. Valter Malosti directs a joint production that marks Valeria Solarino’s return to the theatre, as Strindberg’s Miss Julie. Another outstanding co-production is 18 mila giorni, a text by Andrea Bajani with Gianmaria Testa and Giuseppe Battiston, about the working class. The guests at the 2010 2011 season who contribute to this important cultural project include Mariangela Gualtieri, Cesare Ronconi, Danio Manfredini, Raffaella Giordano, Maurizio Donadoni, Valeria Parrella, Fausto Paravidino, Pippo Delbono, Emma Dante, Luca De Filippo, Carlo Cecchi, Fabrizio Gifuni, Massimo Castri and many more.